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Lego Art & Design Principles 210

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Gerrard on Fri Jun 05, 2009 3:05 pm

Looks good Rook! And hopefully this can help me in the future.

Oh and did you mean "thank?"

Yes. Embarassed
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by DarthPineapple on Fri Jun 05, 2009 4:20 pm

Yep and don't forget to remove those old gray slopes. Wink
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Rook on Fri Jun 05, 2009 4:24 pm

DP is right, generally you never want to mix the two dark grays. The only time that you might be able to get away with it is when you're building "stone/rock" formations.

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Tac on Fri Jun 05, 2009 4:31 pm

Rook wrote:DP is right, generally you never want to mix the two dark grays. The only time that you might be able to get away with it is when you're building "stone/rock" formations.

Actually I disagree, in this MOC they don't look that good but in some the grey/bley mixing works really well!

I kow there isn't much old grey but the ones that are there give this walker a relly nice effect.
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Jedi Joe on Fri Jun 05, 2009 6:37 pm

Thunder-blade wrote:
Thanks PhiMa! (even though white balance is still king. Wink )

Nah, I prefer outside pics.

Wooden floors are good for pics, too. And now my new house actually has a wooden floor, I can take some smexy pics of my figs! Razz
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Rook on Fri Jun 05, 2009 7:02 pm

Tac wrote:
Rook wrote:DP is right, generally you never want to mix the two dark grays. The only time that you might be able to get away with it is when you're building "stone/rock" formations.

Actually I disagree, in this MOC they don't look that good but in some the grey/bley mixing works really well!

I kow there isn't much old grey but the ones that are there give this walker a relly nice effect.

That's a very good example of a skilled builder making the two grays work together. Wink

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by foxrex101 on Fri Jun 05, 2009 8:42 pm

Thanks so much Rook. This has helped me alot for my MOC that hopefully will get in the guild. Can someone make a tutorial like Rook's except how to make good ships/speeders.
*Looks at Rook*
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Jens on Fri Jun 05, 2009 10:32 pm

This is my photo box, even better it's a LEGO photo box.



The backside to prove it's a LEGO box, my dad and I "borrowed" it from ToysRus

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Clonecommando007 on Fri Jun 05, 2009 11:11 pm

Very nice design! However may I ask why you have black paper and white siding? It just doesn't make any sense.

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Jens on Fri Jun 05, 2009 11:14 pm

Clonecommando007 wrote:Very nice design! However may I ask why you have black paper and white siding? It just doesn't make any sense.

Because I cut a square in the top and one the sides so light can come in. It has white paper on it to take photos too, but I just put some black paper in it cause it makes better photos IMO.
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Gerrard on Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:54 am

Makes sense, I guess that most people would just think that is would belong the opposite way.

Got a question!

IF you take a picture that has a good lighted background, but no paper or anything behind it, then you use the path tool in GIMP or whatever you use to sketch around it. Then you make a new file with a white background and copy and paste it onto the white background, is that okay to do. Or is it better not to edit it?
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Jens on Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:57 am

Gerrard wrote:Makes sense, I guess that most people would just think that is would belong the opposite way.

Got a question!

IF you take a picture that has a good lighted background, but no paper or anything behind it, then you use the path tool in GIMP or whatever you use to sketch around it. Then you make a new file with a white background and copy and paste it onto the white background, is that okay to do. Or is it better not to edit it?

I always take picture's on solid colours, but I'll just edit it if I were you.
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Gerrard on Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:07 pm

Okay, I just wasn't sure if it would look better edited or with a paper or whatever background.
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Rook on Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:08 pm

Building on an Angle: Part 1 Pythagorean Theorem

You may have remembered me talking about this in another post. I believe it was during the construction of the F-Wing.

One of the most import things to learn as builders is what equals what when building with bricks.

Here's a great example:



This lesson however focuses on knowing the Pythagorean theorem. Knowing it will help you build MOCs with angles. However if you don't use whole numbers you may find yourself struggling for hours in vain to get something to fit or lock in place.



"In any right triangle, the area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares whose sides are the two legs (the two sides that meet at a right angle)."



"Illustration of the Pythagorean theorem. The sum of two sqares whose sides are the two legs (blue and red) is equal to the area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse (purple)."

Examples from TLC include: (Note: TLC used this in the building of the frames that support the exterior plating.)

8039-1: Venator-Class Republic Attack Cruiser


and

6211-1: Imperial Star Destroyer


List of primitive Pythagorean triples up to when C < 100:
(3, 4, 5), (5, 12, 13), (6, 8, 10)*, (7, 24, 25), (8, 15, 17), (9, 40, 41), (11, 60, 61), (12, 35, 37), (13, 84, 85), (16, 63, 65), (20, 21, 29), (28, 45, 53), (33, 56, 65), (36, 77, 85), (39, 80, 89), (48, 55, 73), & (65, 72, 97).

Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_theorem

*Not prime, but added by Rook since it's a helpful one to know.


Last edited by Rook on Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:55 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Darman on Fri Aug 21, 2009 10:43 pm

I guess I am a Intermediate Builders. Thanks for the help rook in fact I am going to go build a Moc right now!
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Halen on Sat Aug 22, 2009 10:57 am

Found this on Flickr just now, goes well with Rooks post.

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Rook on Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:21 pm

Levels of Detail Tutorial

A Photographic Essay

Teacher's comments in BOLD.
Student's comments in standard.

Ok so you have idea. You're playing with 2 minifigures and you imagine your clone shooting a droid but this is what it looks like in reality. How do you transform your imagination into reality?

Take a picture? No you need more than that.


Build a MOC? Start with a base plate.


Put up some walls. Too simple.


Ah brick built verses panels. Nope fail. Wall lacks organization.


Ok then I've built a wall! Too plain.


Ok I'll added a door. Better but not even close.


Ah fancy door way then. Sure now let's get into it.


Tiles the floors, why? Adding a smooth look often adds a sense of realism. Tiles aren't always needed but will add another level of detail.


Now what? Get out your "paint brush". Put some details on that monochromatic wall!


Ok I have a room. What kind of room is it? A control room of some type. Ah hologram nice. Little detail on the floor too.


Ok there's only one thing in the room. Feels unbalanced. Ok should I add another control/display panel?


Ok now detail the control units.


More detail still thinking too simple still. Let's add some texture to the door.


Now let's add some more texture to the wall to balance the texture on the door.


Add some color to minifigures and put some decals on our control stations.


Now take a picture from angle that shows the MOC best.


Finally take a shot of the MOC in a breakdown state. Why? If you ever want to rebuild it having a break down shot can help you remember just exactly how you did it.


Last edited by Rook on Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:30 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Rijulskywalker on Wed Apr 07, 2010 9:24 pm

I think this is the most helpful lesson on LEGO ever. Thanks, Rook!
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by fireworkgamer on Wed Apr 07, 2010 11:47 pm

Wow! Rook...this has really helped me thanks! Smile
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Rijulskywalker on Wed Apr 07, 2010 11:54 pm

That's also a good reason to take a breakdown shot. Never thought of that...
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Tital Wave on Thu Apr 08, 2010 12:32 am

Thanks rook. This helped with my door design. What did you mean by "Paintbrush" Though? An image editing program?
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Green Tee on Thu Apr 08, 2010 2:15 am

No, it's not an image editing program. He added blue bricks to the gray wall to give it a more realistic and un-dull feel. He meant paintbrush as a figure of speech. He just added some more bricks in there. Rook, this was a great idea and great way to teach more about building room/floor scenes.
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Troopa Daisy on Thu Apr 08, 2010 2:31 am

Very helpful Rook. Thanks a lot!

Do you think you could make a tutorial on making cockpits for planes too? Smile
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by eclipsegrafx on Thu Apr 08, 2010 4:21 am

Awesome tutorial Rook, and I am a big fan of well done rooms.

Nice Job!
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Re: Lego Art & Design Principles 210

Post by Tital Wave on Thu Apr 08, 2010 4:27 am

That's what I thought, but I wasn't sure.
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